Double Zimeo Excellence in Media Award Winner – Jay Caboz

I am pleased to announce I was awarded TWO awards at the #Zimeo Excellence in Media Awards hosted at the Birchwood Hotel and Conference Venue in conjunction with the Africa Media Leader Forum

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Me with Chris Bishop (left), my mentor and Managing Editor of Forbes Africa Magazine

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Thanks to all the Forbies who came to support me, and of course Caryn my wife.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I thought what they wrote about me in the publication was quite funny:

Technology A Rat Race Against Death
Jay goes rat-hunting in Angola and finds a reason to give the rodents a thumbs up. IN a country where an estimatated 10 to 20 million landmines are still uncovered 12 years after the country’s civil wart, putting many lives at risk, APOPO, an innovative company founded by a Belgian social entrepreneur, Bart Weetjens, may have found a solution: Mine-sniffing rats trained to de-mine the country’s town and villages.

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Rats that Save lives – Forbes Africa Magazine

Maritime Economy – The Dead Port that Rose Again
For centuries, the Port of Maputo was a rich gateway between Africa and the trade winds of the open seas. However, years of civil wat and crumbling decline left the port crippled and all but buried. Tweleve years ago, it woke up to stage one of Africa’s great comebacks. Jay brings the port to life with his delightful story-telling techniques.

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The Port of Maputo – Forbes Africa Magazine

Powerful #FeesMustFall images from South Africa

Location: Union Buildings, Pretoria, South Africa

On assignment for Forbes Africa Magazine  to cover the #FeesMustFall campaign

We went expecting drama, and we got it. On the back of the growing #FeesMustFall campaign, thousands of University students protested on the banks of the Union Buildings in an effort to reduce fee increases which were set to rise as much as 10%.

As the bangs of of stun grenades met the cheers of students taunting police, Jacob Zuma, the President of South Africa, met with University officials and student leaders to negotiate terms. It was a case of too little too late as an isolated group of 50 students ran riot, fueled by frustration, setting toilets, cars and tyres alight. The group tore down the fence blockading the national landmark and pelted police with wrenches, rocks and pretty much anything they could find.

By the time tear gas canisters were launched into the air, the president was to announce that an settlement of a 0% fee increase for 2016 was reached. The crowd was yet to be informed.

The scene was bizarre. Among all this violence, the atmosphere beyond was light hearted and  relaxed.  I caught a number of students, standing next to the inferno, with people launching projectiles over the fence,  posing for selfies.

It was unfortunate that the thousands of other students, who were for the most part peacefully attending the protest, were caught in the peppery gas. In my view, the crowd was dispersed in the nick of time: I had seen three students preparing petrol bombs from an the abandoned generator left behind by the TV. Things could have gotten far worse.

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“This was the moment the police line broke and all hell broke loose” says Photojournalist @jaycaboz on his photo taken today at the #UnionBuildings #FeesMustFall protests. This on the back of President Jacob Zuma agreeing to a 0% fee increase for 2016.

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A small group of students led the violence outside the Union Buildings. The tension grew as the crowd got bolder, beginning with burning tyres and throwing projectiles.

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Students then grabbed toilets and set those alight.

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Among the bizarre, were students posing for selfies while behind them more fuel was fed to the inferno.

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More posing for the camera, while the smoke engulfs the hill.

 

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Illustrating my point. Here are students standing with a placard…

 

 

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…next to them are other students throwing rocks at the police.

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This was the moment the police line broke and all hell broke loose. After a wave of rocks, wrenches and bottles were thrown at them the police were forced back. Seconds later, the razor wire barrier came.

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After the students gained their foothold they began to destroy the police vehicles, ultimately leading to the tear gas.

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Students flee from the tear gas.

 




 

 

Cover Shoot – Analjit Singh, Healthcare for Forbes Africa Magazine

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Portrait – Analjit Singh, Healthcare

Max India’s Analjit Singh Builds Grand Estate In South Africa — FORBES ONLINE

Words by our very own Editor of Forbes Woman Africa MagazineRenuka Methil

We step out of Analjit Singh’s blue Lexus into a picture postcard. Such is the scenic beauty greeting us. Singh is dressed in blue–shirt, turban and Nehru jacket–and poses with the panoramic mountains, also blue, in the background. We are standing under a benevolent April sun in Leeu Estates, Singh’s farm in Franschhoek, a picturesque wine town in South Africa’s Western Cape province. Singh points to a large white cross perched like a beacon on the slopes of the Dassenberg Mountain. “Everything below that cross is mine,” he says.

FA 2015 Jul OFCWe are on 68 hectares of farmland featuring vineyards, pomegranate and plum fields, oaks, olive trees and herb gardens. Men are at work laying bricks, building and restoring Cape Dutch edifices, putting together the many elements of what will be a boutique winery and 25-room, five-star hotel set to open next year as part of the Leeu Collection. “Leeu is our name [in South Africa]. In Afrikaans it means lion, just as Singh in Sanskrit means lion,” says Singh. For the record, the number plate on his Lexus SW is, no surprise, LEEU 1.

Singh says that the manor house under construction will also include a library containing both Gandhi and Mandela memorabilia. The manor house overlooks a manicured garden with art occupying center stage–life-size bronze sculptures by South African artist Deborah Bell handpicked by Singh. “I know all the people in the art world in Cape Town,” he says. “We have been acquiring art and sculptures, all of which will be displayed at our estate.”

Leeu Estates is a composite of three adjoining farms–Dieu Donné, Klein Dassenberg and Von Ortloff–that Singh bought in a year. The total investment in the development is $35 million.

The estate will include a gym and spa and a winery producing the Mullineux & Leeu Family Wines, overseen by husband-wife winemaking duo Chris and Andrea Mullineux. Winners of the 2014 Platter’s Winery of the Year Award, the couple will develop a Leeu range of premium wines for release at the end of 2016.

Follow the link to read more: Max India’s Analjit Singh Builds Grand Estate In South Africa — FORBES ONLINE

Photography – Jay Caboz

Location – Franschhoek, Western Cape, South Africa

So there we were, in the wine valley of Franschhoek, and we get to meet Analjit Singh. It might not look it from the photos, but I promise you that it was raining for basically the entire time we had with him. The sun came out for about an hour, and in that time, we had to drive to his farmhouse (which is still being built), set up and then shoot like mad.

No time, for expensive lighting. Nada. So I whipped out my trusty flash on wifi remote and we got going.

I remember telling the editor of Forbes Woman Africa, on our way back:

“This story is going to be cover material. I bet you its going to be a cover.” — Well I was right.

Originally we were only going to shoot for an interior story, so the fact that the weather came out to play for a bit was no real issue. BUT if there is one lesson you can learn from being a journalist is never underestimate the importance of a story. The same should be applied if you are a photographer along for the ride.

Everything came together for a few minutes just enough time to get the shots I wanted. What a miserable day it would have been if we couldn’t an outdoor portrait to drive the point home, who wants to do an indoor photoshoot when you are here in one of the most beautiful areas of South Africa.

So what did I learn from this shoot? — Shoot as if every photo you are taking is going to be seen on the cover of a magazine. No matter who is behind the lens, the fact that you are speaking with a Billionaire does lend itself to that but you just never know.

As far as my interaction with Mr Singh went? The saying “he is a true scholar and a gentleman” is meant for him.

Publication – Forbes Africa Magazine, July 2015 edition

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Portrait – Simmi Areff, Comedian

Portrait – Simmi Areff, Comedian

With just R30 in his pocket and a dream of being in the spotlight Simmi Areff moved to Johannesburg to become a comedian. A man never far from a hookah pipe or a trending tweet Areff looks for any excuse to get up on stage to crack jokes for his supper.

It’s a typical Friday afternoon for comedian Simmi Areff. He sits across the table in the Joburg Theatre Canteen, South Africa, with a hookah pipe in one hand and a cup of tea in the other. Every ten minutes his phone vibrates as his manager valiantly tries to track him down. Areff is surprisingly calm for someone who will in two hours’ time go on stage.  It even more surprising when he says hasn’t got a clue about what he will say on stage.

“After tonight I’ll be able to tell you if I was ready or not, but the only thing I can do wrong is disappoint them. I have about 30 minutes of the show, but it’s that last 15 minutes. I don’t know if I’m going to talk to people or what. Lots of people say that talking to people is not part of a one man show, but it’s what I’m good at. It’s what I’m known for, so why not. So I’m going to talk to people, I don’t know who yet but I’m going to do it,” he says through a cloud of mint flavoured smoke.

Photography – Jay Caboz

Location – Joburg Theatre, Johannesburg South Africa

Areff’s career has steadily taken shape. This photo was taken just before his first one man show at the Joburg Theatre. “HaHa-Laal” caused quite a stir in the Mulim community over the use of the logo. Regardless he has proven time and again that he is an up-and-coming in the South African comedy scene worth keeping an eye out for.

Publication – Forbes Africa Magazine

Simmi Areff comedian for Forbes Africa/Life Magazine before his first one mand show Its not Hahalaal

Simmi Areff comedian for Forbes Africa/Life Magazine before his first one man show Its not Hahalaal 2014

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Standard Bank Sikuvile Journalism Awards – Feature Photo and Young Journalist Finalist Jay Caboz

I am pleased to announce that I have been selected as a finalist in the Standard Bank Sikuvile Journalism Awards. I am going to feature in the Feature Photography category among some of South Africa’s biggest hitters:
Brenton Geach
, James Oatway, Leon Sadiki, Alon Skuy and Paballo Thekiso.

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My story to feature in Feature Photos Category: Paddling through Sewage and Facing Guns. Nkosi Mzolo and the Soweto Canoe & Recreation Club (SCARC)

I am also a finalist in the Young Journalist of the Year Category that features a number of up-and-coming journos who have been  be kicking ass: Poppy Louw, Sihle Mlambo and my fellow MPW mate AlaisterRussell.

It is an honor to be named among such well known journalists, who I have looked up to since I began my journey into the field.

This was my letter of motivation: Dusi – Paddling Through Sewage and Facing Guns

It was an unimaginable story. A canoe club in Soweto were gliding through sewage and risking the wrath of gun wielding fishermen to triumph in an exclusive sport and smash stereotypes.

On any night, you will find Nkosi Mzolo and the Soweto Canoe & Recreation Club (SCARC) on the water.  Scholars, welders and clerks all paddle for the chance of a brighter future as a professional.  An inspirational tale that shows people can make it anywhere if they fight hard enough.

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It wasn’t an easy assignment. It took weeks to track Mozolo down; it was worth it.  He had quite a story to tell.

I spent two days with the club members at their home, at time trails, and at the Power Park Dam. It wasn’t enough.

At the time, the club was training to compete in the Dusi Marathon, I was told that several of their members were expected to do well. I needed to follow them to complete the story.

For three days I followed the race in the searing heat, treacherous rapids and hidden rocks more than 800 paddlers risked their necks on 119 kilometres of the rough white waters of KwaZulu Natal’s (KZN) Msunduzi River. The Soweto paddlers did well. What started as a small story 200 word story became a panoramic photo essay that took six months.

Dusi Marathon

For three days I watched them bleed and sweat. A large part of the story is who did not do so well. Jacques Theron and Shaun Griffen broke their canoe in half early on Day 3 and ran the rest of the way to Durban, carrying half each. They refused to give up.

This is what reporting in Africa should be; recognizing the value of a story, digging deep, sticking with it and shattering the shackles of stereotypes.  As a photojournalist for Forbes Africa it was a difficult one to capture. You are torn between spending your time waist deep in water to wait for a photograph and outrunning the leaders. Outrunning them means another wade in the water. You can’t drive to much of the race.

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Sometimes you get too close. In search of the shot I often found myself stuck in the middle of the river. I can still hear the scrape of the canoes on the rocks as they brushed by.

The story of the Dusi is of grit and determination.  It’s not your average feature story you hear but it’s difficult to tell without dedication and the taking of risks.

More new photos from Cape Town 2015 – Jay Caboz

Photo Excursion to Cape Town 2015 – Jay Caboz

Taken from my recent trip to Cape Town 2015. Thanks to my family for being so patient when I scream stop from the car!

I seem to be in the Mother City quite alot this year – here is a link to some older photos

Day Trip to Cape Point Cape of Good Hope Nature Reserve, 2015

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Scarborough, 2015. A delayed exposure using a ND Filter

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Cape Point, 2015

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Cape Point Reserve, 2015

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Panoramic taken while on the way into the reserve

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Cape Town’s Bantry Bay and Sea Point, 2015

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Snuck in some beach shots while everyone else was making supper.

 

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View of the ocean from the flat in Sea Point, a perfect place for sundowners

 

 

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The crips clear sea of Camps Bay,2015

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View of the Twelve Apostles and Camps Bay below.

Hike to the top of Lions Head, 2015

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Hike to the top of Lions Head

 

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Trip to Stellenbosch for some WINE, 2015

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WINE, 2015

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The Stellenbosch wine region, 2015

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Portrait – Luke Callcott-Stevens and Gavin James, Rainmaker Energy Projects

Portrait – Luke Callcott-Stevens and Gavin James, Rainmaker Energy Projects 

(2013) For the owners of Rainmaker Energy Projects it’s hard to imagine what 40 towering wind turbines will look like, Luke Callcott-Stevens and Gavin James are spending R2.5 billion ($274 million) to find out.

Many scoffed when 28 renewable energy tenders were put out by the South African government.  In 12 months’ time, the programme  breathed new life into an energy starved country that faces tough times.

In just 18 months a few modest farms on the plains of the Eastern Cape, South Africa were transformed into the third largest wind farm in sub-Saharan Africa.  The Dorper Wind Farm will produces 100 megawatts (MW) of energy a year.

“You build a wind farm in 18 months…after four or five years of hard work,” says Callcott-Stevens.

Photography – Jay Caboz

Location – Juta Street, Johannesburg South Africa

I dove into the archives for this photo. It was one of the first stories I did for Forbes Africa in 2013. At the time the Eskom’s Renewable Energy Project (REIPPP) was just a flower blooming, renweable energy was the South African wild west. Now it is one of the few good stories to tell when it comes to South Africa’s power producer.

Because their wind farm hadn’t been built yet, we went conceptual on the shot and I asked them to include the small model wind turbines.

Publication – Forbes Africa Magazine

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Portrait – Selaelo Selota, Musician

Portrait – Selaelo Selota, Musician 

At 17 years old, Selaelo Selota, set to work toiling under the earth risaking his life for $500 a month  at the Deelkraal Gold Mining Company in Carletonville, west of Johannesburg.

“I started earning about R25 ($2.50) a week and later R320 ($32) a month… The di­fference is a loaf of bread was 50 cents then and to catch a bus from Carletonville to Johannesburg was R1.20 ($0.12),” he says.

That was the pay for eight hours of digging in the dark by the light on your helmet. All around are toxins that can kill you. In the darkness you listen for falling rocks that can crush you.

“You learn many things underground, like when you see a snake, you run after it because when it’s running away, the mine is collapsing,” he says.

Here Selota took a great interest in the theater. Through it all, he learned the vibrant music and dances from the many men of the mines.

“There was this old man, I liked the way he was always so well dressed because he was from the city… He took me to Johannesburg where I sat in a few theory classes at the African music and drama association.”

Selota registered for music lessons at the Federal Union for Black Arts (FUBA). Back at the mines the talk of strikes and wage negotiations was a distraction from music that would force him from the mines. During the rise of the National Union of Mineworkers, under Cyril Ramaphosa, they went on strike but were overpowered by soldiers in 1987.

“After a long day of being exhausted with tear gas fumes and waking up from the ground my head became sober. I was like ‘What am I doing here? I’m still young… and I paid money in Johannesburg to study music and I have never been to the music school.”

The next morning Selota took the first train to the city to start classes at FUBA. By day he was a music student; by night he was a miner. He wanted to leave mining to concentrate on his music, but it was not easy.

“I told the manager that I had decided to go to school to study mining mythology so I could come back to work at the mine.”

Johannesburg may have been an escape but the streets of the City of Gold were far from paved with it. Selota spent his first few nights on the floor of the FUBA dance school where he used a curtain as a blanket. For a while he struggled to sleep as all he could feel was the blood pounding in his swollen arms from the years of laboring underground. Playing music came naturally to Selota and before he knew it he was playing at gigs and earning money. After the course he took on a few other small jobs, which led him to the University of Cape Town where he studied Jazz Composition.

Photography – Jay Caboz

Location – Pixley ka Isaka Seme Street, formerly Sauer Street, South Africa

Selota’s career began in the mines and Johannesburg. Located in the hert of Johannesburg, close to the Chmaber of mines there is a mine shaft stautue that we though would best reflect the journey this musician has gone through. For the shoot we asked Selota to bring his guitar and suit and he kindly broke out a few chords. I lit him with a portable off camera flash using a wireless trigger, making him pop in the photo. Luckily the weather was overcast which agve me some nice flat even light.  Selota’s shirt and guitar really stood out in the bland facebrick background.

Publication – Forbes Life Africa Magazine

Selaelo Selothe

New photos from Cape Town 2015 – Jay Caboz

Photo Excursion to Cape Town 2015 – Jay Caboz

Taken from my recent trips to Cape Town 2015. These were taken in February this year in between shoots with Brimstone.

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Bantry Bay, 2015

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Sea Point, 2015

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Sea Point, 2015

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Sea Point, 2015

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I just had to include this series of shots.

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A windy day on Table Mountain

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The view from the top of the cable way

 

 

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In summer, you can catch the cable way to watch the sunset from the top of Table Mountain.

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After watching the sunset, I drive around to Signal Hill to get this panoramic.

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A windy day on Table Mountain, 2015. Delayed exposures of the fynbos blowing in the gusts.

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A windy day on Table Mountain, 2015. Delayed exposures of the fynbos blowing in the gusts.

 

 

Portrait – Phillip Ndou, Boxer

Portrait – Phillip Ndou, Boxer

South African Phillip Ndou is the only African to have ever fought Floyd Mayweather. Ndou was sidelined in the WBC lightweight title fight over ten years ago, knocked out in the 7th round. He suffered from a serious brain injury and was forced to the sidelines. November 2013 he starteda major comeback as a professional. He dreams of once again squaring off with the worlds best boxer in a revenge fight.

Photography – Jay Caboz
Location – Soweto with Phillip Ndou
Publication – see the articles here Forbes Africa Magazine Nov 2013 Issue

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