Jay Caboz – Zimeo Finalist in two Catergories

I am glad to announce that I am a finalist in two categories at the ZIMEO “Excellence in Media” Awards Finalists List. Thanks once again to Forbes Africa for sending me all over the continent to write the stories I want.

Nairobi, 28th October 2015Finalists in the first edition of the Zimeo “excellence in Media” Awards have been announced today following a rigorous judging process led by independent pan-African panels of judges.

This is the first edition of the awards, which were launched by the African Media Initiative (AMI) in June 2015, to recognize excellence in journalism by rewarding stories that demonstrate high standards of professionalism and speak to the continent’s development issues. The awards received a total of 557 entries from 41 countries across the continent, from Anglophone, Francophone, and Lusophone Africa.

ZIMEO “Excellence in Media” Awards Finalists List

TECHNOLOGY

Jean Pierre Afadhali, The East African, Rwanda

“Rwanda ups measures for Internet to curb the abuse of Children Online”

Jay Caboz, Forbes International, South Africa

“A Rat Race Against Death”

Rats_-5

 

Wacera Ngunjiri, Africa 24 Media, Kenya

“Cape town Gunshot detection system”

Adeline Tchouakak,  Le Messager, Cameroon

“Les réseaux sociaux pour remplacer les médias classiques ?”

THE MARITIME ECONOMY

Jay Caboz, Forbes Africa Magazine, South Africa

The Dead Port That Rose Again

IMG_1007

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wanjohi Kabukuru, New African Magazine, Kenya

“President Michel: Oceans Fundamental to Africa’s Existence” & “A Parable Of Success

George Sunguh, Our Ports Magazine, Kenya

“PMAESA Ports Increase Capacity Ahead of Demand”

 

Advertisements

Portrait – Colin Nathan, Boxing Coach

Portrait -Colin Nathan, Boxing Coach

Article by Forbes Africa Journalist Thobile Hans

Colin Nathan is one of the few people who can say they are living the dream. As a successful boxing trainer, he wakes up every morning and looks forward to going to work.

He shares his beautiful house in Norwood, south of Johannesburg, with his wife Lara, his eight-year-old son Daniel and a new addition to the family, Jamie, who is only two months old. After settling in at his home, we get straight to where it all began for the man some regard as presently the most successful trainer in the country.

“I was only seven years old when I started nagging my father to take me with him to the boxing gym,” he says.

Nathan brightens up and become passionate when he talks about his formative years in boxing while growing up in Cape Town. His father, Stan, was a cutman and worked with boxers like the Whiteboy brothers Chris and Derrick, Sydney Hoho and Bashew Sibaca.

At the Sea Point Boxing Club, the young Nathan fell in love with the hustle and bustle of the boxing gym. His favorite activity was using boxers’ stomachs as punching bag, and the pugilists were happy to let him as he was too small and skinny to hurt them.

In 1988, while in the fourth grade at school, Nathan remembers yelling instructions at the sparring boxers, much to the amusement of everyone in the gym. Noticing his growing passion for the sport, Stan started taking his son to work with him in the corners of his boxers. This was illegal and when noticed in 1990, Stan was forced to register him as a bucket boy. This makes Nathan the youngest bucket man in South African history Nathan’s involvement in boxing deepened when he moved to Johannesburg in 1998 to double up as a television presenter on SABC.

This led to him becoming the youngest boxing commentator in the country at 20 years of age. Another milestone was in 2000 when Nathan, at the age of 22, became the youngest South African to own a boxing gym – the Hot Box Gym in Glenhazel, a north-eastern suburb of Johannesburg. After making a name for himself on television, boxers started approaching Nathan to be their manager. The first professional boxer in his stable was bantamweight, Andries Dick, who won his first five fights under Nathan. His second was Springkaan Khongoane who is still working with Nathan to this day. By this time, Nathan knew he wanted to become a fulltime trainer.

Being relatively young, it was tough convincing the boxing fraternity that he was the real deal. Boxing authorities used to mistake him for a boxer during weigh-ins and he found it difficult to convince promoters to sign his fighters. Around two years later, Khongoane became his first champion when he won the provincial super bantam weight title. With his growing success, former national champions like Tshepo Lefele, Mpush Makambi and Malcolm Klassen started joining his ranks and it became more and more difficult for Nathan to keep his head above the turbulent waters.

He decided to sign up with KO promotions and later with Branco Sports Productions, run by Branco Milenkovic. In 2005, he approached the biggest promoter in the country, Rodney Berman, who told Nathan he didn’t have any boxers he wanted to promote. Berman, however, had a change of heart the following year and signed up the young trainer in the Golden Gloves Promotions family. The rest is history.

“The last eight years have been nothing short of amazing,” says Nathan.

He has great respect for Berman, whom he says is one of his idols. Nathan rubbishes claims that the only reason Berman gave him a chance was because they are both Jewish. At one stage, people even said he was Berman’s nephew, especially when the promoter walked him down the aisle at his wedding. Berman’s faith in Nathan has paid off.

He has since produced world champions like Hekkie Budler, the IBO and WBA strawweight champion and the Ring Magazine’s No.1 ranked boxer in his division, and Zolani Marali, the former WBF junior-welterweight champion. He is also training the highly-rated Ryno Liebenberg who is undefeated in 16 fights. To take his training to the next level, Nathan spent two weeks with Freddie Roach, considered by many to be the world’s greatest trainer, in his Wild Card gym in Los Angeles. So, what did Nathan learn from Manny Pacquiao’s famous trainer?

“Commitment and responsibility,” says Nathan.

He has also met and taken advice from other renowned trainers like Angelo Dundee, who worked with Muhammad Ali, and Teddy Atlas, who worked with Mike Tyson. But does he consider himself the best trainer in South Africa? “In my eyes, yes, I think I am,” he says.

The latest success is Budler. The trainer considers Budler’s win over the dangerous Nkosinathi Joyi as his best achievement.

“Few gave light-hitting Hekkie a chance against the hard-hitting Joyi. But people didn’t know that I briefly worked with Joyi in my gym and I knew his weak points,” he says.

His biggest disappointment was when Budler lost his IBO light flyweight title, his only professional loss, by a split decision to Gideon Buthelezi. Colin Nathan says he was the first in the country to open his gym to commercial clients. He boasts training celebrities like musician Danny K, sport presenter Carol Tshabalala and President Jacob Zuma’s son, Duduzane. Although he now is well known in the country, Nathan has his wife and kids to ground him whenever he gets big-headed. To prove the point, he asks his wife who the best boxing trainer in the country is. With a mischievous smile on her face, Lara says “Nick Durandt?”

Photography – Jay Caboz

Location – Hot Box Gym  – Glenhazel, Johannesburg South Africa

Nathan’s shoot proved to be quite a challenge. The gym was quite “busy”, not unusual for a boxing gym, with loads of equipment and very low lighting. To eliminate this we went with a shallow depth of field shot and I used two portable flashes at a 45 degree angle to pop him out. It’s kind of standard lighting set up that I am comfortable with in low light situations.

He had these really awesome training gloves, the ones used by coaches for sparring, with his name on them that perfectly summed up who he is and what he does. We went for a strong body position and asked him to flex his muscles a bit.

Publication – Forbes Africa Magazine, December-January 2014 edition

DSC_8709

Portrait – Simmi Areff, Comedian

Portrait – Simmi Areff, Comedian

With just R30 in his pocket and a dream of being in the spotlight Simmi Areff moved to Johannesburg to become a comedian. A man never far from a hookah pipe or a trending tweet Areff looks for any excuse to get up on stage to crack jokes for his supper.

It’s a typical Friday afternoon for comedian Simmi Areff. He sits across the table in the Joburg Theatre Canteen, South Africa, with a hookah pipe in one hand and a cup of tea in the other. Every ten minutes his phone vibrates as his manager valiantly tries to track him down. Areff is surprisingly calm for someone who will in two hours’ time go on stage.  It even more surprising when he says hasn’t got a clue about what he will say on stage.

“After tonight I’ll be able to tell you if I was ready or not, but the only thing I can do wrong is disappoint them. I have about 30 minutes of the show, but it’s that last 15 minutes. I don’t know if I’m going to talk to people or what. Lots of people say that talking to people is not part of a one man show, but it’s what I’m good at. It’s what I’m known for, so why not. So I’m going to talk to people, I don’t know who yet but I’m going to do it,” he says through a cloud of mint flavoured smoke.

Photography – Jay Caboz

Location – Joburg Theatre, Johannesburg South Africa

Areff’s career has steadily taken shape. This photo was taken just before his first one man show at the Joburg Theatre. “HaHa-Laal” caused quite a stir in the Mulim community over the use of the logo. Regardless he has proven time and again that he is an up-and-coming in the South African comedy scene worth keeping an eye out for.

Publication – Forbes Africa Magazine

Simmi Areff comedian for Forbes Africa/Life Magazine before his first one mand show Its not Hahalaal

Simmi Areff comedian for Forbes Africa/Life Magazine before his first one man show Its not Hahalaal 2014

20131122-IMG_9647

 

Portrait – Jeanine-Dee and Clint Hartog, Cosplayers

Portrait – Jeanine-Dee and Clint Hartog, Cosplayers

Article by Jay Caboz

It’s a typical Johannesburg day in the suburbs. People are walking their dogs and men sell feather dusters on the sides of the road. A big story here is when the garbage truck comes late. But knock on the door of number 26 Heathfield, Fairlands, and out comes a married couple fully clad in pink and bone armour and ready to battle dinosaurs or gigantic monsters should they threaten this fair land.

On a scorching Johannesburg summer’s day, this was the meeting of Jeanine-Dee and Clint Hartog, a graphic designer and salesman, just two of the many devotees of cosplay. Cos What? Cosplayers are the following who dress as their favorite characters from the ever-growing gaming, anime and comic book industry.

“If you think this is bad, try walking around the whole day at KinCon. Clint sweated so badly people were afraid to go near him by the end of the day,” says Jeanine-Dee.

Cosplay is an idea born in Japan, but took off in America at comic book conventions. The gaming characters rarely fail to turn heads.

“I think it’s becoming a character that you’re ideally a fan of. Mainly cosplayers with other fans that have the same love of games or an anime character. At the end of the day you are a cosplayer,” says the 27-year-old game fan Jeanine-Dee.

“It’s fun to be in the life of that character for that day,” says Clint.

The Hartogs are not your average married couple; their home is like entering a temple to the gods of gaming. Piles of DVDs ring the lounge. Boxes filled with colored materials reach the ceiling and a spare bed is littered with Pokémon plush toys. The crowning glory is the couple’s two TV sets, enshrined by PS3s and gaming gadgets.

“For me, it’s improved my confidence. I used to be very shy. It’s improved my creativity. It’s something that if you are interested in dressing up like Dr Who, then do it. You don’t know where it will end up,” says Jeanine-Dee.

Their custom outfits, made from 3mm to 10mm thick EVA foam, was painstakingly moulded into Helms, Plates, Gauntlets, Waists and Leggings as per the game. In Monster Hunter, ‘Kali’ and ‘Squall’, as they are known in the PSP game, are bounty hunters that take down the monsters to earn rewards. The couple are such big fans of the game they even run their own guild, where they link with other fans on weekends for multiplayer game.

“You can make your outfit from scratch. Or you can buy your costume online or you can even get a seamstress to make your outfit for you. Creating this armor was like a puzzle. We dissected each armor piece and then worked from there. There are basic patterns like for a kimono or a jacket. But basically you have to go from there to make it suit  your own character,” says Jeanine-Dee.

The armor took two solid months of breaking their backs on their lounge floor. It’s a common night for the pair to crawl into their bed with burnt fingers from their glue gun called Grimer, a goo-like Pokémon; covered in layers of paint; and their eyes square from playing games.

For the Hartogs, the blistered fingers and long nights sewing armor were all worth it. At the August KinCon convention, held in Edenvale, Johannesburg, Jeanine-Dee’s outfit won whilst Clint’s placed third in the gaming category.

“It’s nerve-wracking. Normally you have to do a two-minute skit. Basically you have to become the persona of your character; you have to show yourself as that character. When you enter you have to give a reference picture to the judges so that they can see where you are from and if you have the correct detail…Some rules only allow you to enter a cosplay outfit once. At another competition you would have to make a whole new one,” says Jeanine-Dee.

“A lot of guys struggle with their first time. We encourage people to just try it once, even if you just go as a casual cosplay. Just try it once and see if you like it. We look at our first cosplay pictures and we think to ourselves why did we wear that? It was so terrible. But we’ve grown our skills since then,” says Clint.

If nothing else, Jeanine-Dee and Clint are dedicated. They have been fans of cosplay for several years. The couple even went as far as taking a road trip to Port Elizabeth (PE), a 1,000 kilometer journey, for a convention. The drive down was an unusual affair as Jeanine spent most of the trip embroidering their outfits. When they emerged from the parking lot, their cosplays nearly blew away in the city’s notorious gusty wind, a hazard for any want-to-be cosplayer.

“We were the only ones from Jo’burg, so when people were asking us where we were from, we would start by saying ‘we’re from a game called…’and they would say ‘no no no, like where are you from in South Africa’ and we would say Jo’burg. They were really excited. We were the only guys who said we would go and we actually managed the distance,” says Clint.

“I suppose you could say we will go the distance for cosplay,” says Jeanine- Dee with a cheeky smile behind her Rathian Heart U armor. In the meantime, the couple has lots of work to do. Plans for an outfit that will show in Cape Town in the first Saturday of May have already begun.

“Clint and I have done a lot of gaming characters this year. A lot of people say we are gaming cosplayers, so next year we are going to spice things up. It might mean a female Loki popping up,” says Jeanine-Dee. Their neighbors will surely be on the lookout to catch a glimpse of the couple on their next adventure in the ever-safe suburb of Fairlands.

Photography – Jay Caboz

Location – Kali Kitty Cosplay  – Fairlands, Johannesburg South Africa

I will proudly admit that I am an Anime and game lover. I go absolutely gaga when it comes to watching the stuff. So when you get the opportunity to feature something in a magazine that you love, you put in that extra effort.

I met Kali Kitty Cosplay at rAge 2014, they had dragged two of their friends to the event to make a quadrofactor of Legend of Zeldas. AND so their story began. Cosplay has without a doubt exploded in South Africa. Every rAge I go to there are more and more people dressing as their favorite characters, who knows maybe one day I will don a Naruto outfit and strut around.

Jeanine and Clint were awesome to work with. Trust me when I say their outfits are no joke. Every piece of armor is painstaking made form scratch.  So it made complete sense to do the photo shoot in their home, where it all takes place.

Publication – Forbes Africa Magazine, December-January 2014 edition

IMG_3455 IMG_3325

Portrait – Selaelo Selota, Musician

Portrait – Selaelo Selota, Musician 

At 17 years old, Selaelo Selota, set to work toiling under the earth risaking his life for $500 a month  at the Deelkraal Gold Mining Company in Carletonville, west of Johannesburg.

“I started earning about R25 ($2.50) a week and later R320 ($32) a month… The di­fference is a loaf of bread was 50 cents then and to catch a bus from Carletonville to Johannesburg was R1.20 ($0.12),” he says.

That was the pay for eight hours of digging in the dark by the light on your helmet. All around are toxins that can kill you. In the darkness you listen for falling rocks that can crush you.

“You learn many things underground, like when you see a snake, you run after it because when it’s running away, the mine is collapsing,” he says.

Here Selota took a great interest in the theater. Through it all, he learned the vibrant music and dances from the many men of the mines.

“There was this old man, I liked the way he was always so well dressed because he was from the city… He took me to Johannesburg where I sat in a few theory classes at the African music and drama association.”

Selota registered for music lessons at the Federal Union for Black Arts (FUBA). Back at the mines the talk of strikes and wage negotiations was a distraction from music that would force him from the mines. During the rise of the National Union of Mineworkers, under Cyril Ramaphosa, they went on strike but were overpowered by soldiers in 1987.

“After a long day of being exhausted with tear gas fumes and waking up from the ground my head became sober. I was like ‘What am I doing here? I’m still young… and I paid money in Johannesburg to study music and I have never been to the music school.”

The next morning Selota took the first train to the city to start classes at FUBA. By day he was a music student; by night he was a miner. He wanted to leave mining to concentrate on his music, but it was not easy.

“I told the manager that I had decided to go to school to study mining mythology so I could come back to work at the mine.”

Johannesburg may have been an escape but the streets of the City of Gold were far from paved with it. Selota spent his first few nights on the floor of the FUBA dance school where he used a curtain as a blanket. For a while he struggled to sleep as all he could feel was the blood pounding in his swollen arms from the years of laboring underground. Playing music came naturally to Selota and before he knew it he was playing at gigs and earning money. After the course he took on a few other small jobs, which led him to the University of Cape Town where he studied Jazz Composition.

Photography – Jay Caboz

Location – Pixley ka Isaka Seme Street, formerly Sauer Street, South Africa

Selota’s career began in the mines and Johannesburg. Located in the hert of Johannesburg, close to the Chmaber of mines there is a mine shaft stautue that we though would best reflect the journey this musician has gone through. For the shoot we asked Selota to bring his guitar and suit and he kindly broke out a few chords. I lit him with a portable off camera flash using a wireless trigger, making him pop in the photo. Luckily the weather was overcast which agve me some nice flat even light.  Selota’s shirt and guitar really stood out in the bland facebrick background.

Publication – Forbes Life Africa Magazine

Selaelo Selothe

Portrait – South Africa Squash Woman No.1 Siyoli Waters and brother Luvuyiso Lusaseni Lions Rugby Union

Portrait – South Africa’s Woman Rank No. 1 Siyoli Waters and brother Luvuyiso Lusaseni Lions Rugby Union

South Africa’s women squash champion Siyoli Waters and her younger brother Luvuyiso Lusaseni, professional rugby player with the Lions Rugby Union in Johannesburg. We challenged the two for a brother versus sister competition in the squash court. Needless to say Siyoli won quite easily. I nearly got hit twice during the match.

Photography – Jay Caboz
Location – The Wanderers Club, Johannesburg with Siyoli Waters and Luvuyiso Lusaseni
Publication – see the articles here Forbes Africa Magazine November Issue

IMG_9961

Portrait – Tariq Yusuf, Solar Power

Portrait – Tariq Yusuf, Solar Power

Yusuf is the man behind the Intratrek 260-hectare, 100MW solar power plant under construction in Zimbabwe; one of the first solar projects of its kind in the county. Yusuf is also linked with the Tara KLamp, a controversial medical tool used for circumcisions in South Africa’s Kwa-Zulu Natal province.

Photography – Jay Caboz
Location – An abandoned field in Johannesburg with Tariq Yusuf
Publication – see the articles here Forbes Africa Magazine August Issue

IMG_0263

These pics say it all – 10 Days of Mourning in photos

My fav pics from the 10 Days of Mourning for former South African President Nelson Mandela.

The Announcement - Luc Reymond stands with his mother Kate and sister Mia. Luc left his school blazer as a memoir hoping it will keep the President warm in the afterlife. Kate said the boy wanted to leave behind something he loved wearing.

The Announcement – Luc Reymond stands with his mother Kate and sister Mia. Luc left his school blazer as a memoir hoping it will keep the President warm in the afterlife. Kate said the boy wanted to leave behind something he loved wearing.

The Announcement - Sandile Shangase, a law student at the University of the Witwatersrand, stands with Christopher Strong, a pupil at St Johns college, commemorate the death of former South African President Nelson Mandela outside his home in Houghton, Johannesburg, South Africa on December 06.

The Announcement – Sandile Shangase, a law student at the University of the Witwatersrand, stands with Christopher Strong, a pupil at St Johns college, commemorate the death of former South African President Nelson Mandela outside his home in Houghton, Johannesburg, South Africa on December 06.

The Day of Prayer - Markham Moodley stands and prays outside the home of former South African President Nelson Mandela on Sunday 07 December. Markham says he met with Mandela in his home in 2011 in Qunu, in the Eastern Province. He says the visit was unforgettable and he was privileged to have met the man. He brought his wife Michelle and two daughters Racquel 8 and Nikeziah 4. "No words can prepare you for when you met him. Mandela laughed with you, all he said to me was welcome but that was enough. That he took the time to speak to me and ask me questions was enough." I had to bring my children to see what this all means, to remember the day he died and how much he means to the country.

The Day of Prayer – Markham Moodley stands and prays outside the home of former South African President Nelson Mandela on Sunday 07 December. Markham says he met with Mandela in his home in 2011 in Qunu, in the Eastern Province. He says the visit was unforgettable and he was privileged to have met the man. He brought his wife Michelle and two daughters Racquel 8 and Nikeziah 4. “No words can prepare you for when you met him. Mandela laughed with you, all he said to me was welcome but that was enough. That he took the time to speak to me and ask me questions was enough.” I had to bring my children to see what this all means, to remember the day he died and how much he means to the country.

The day of celebration – The official state memorial service was held on December 10 at the FNB Stadium in Johannesburg.

The day of celebration – The official state memorial service was held on December 10 at the FNB Stadium in Johannesburg.

Nokwazi Hlubi camped overnight in order to save her place. Her tent was removed from the stadium entrance by police on security sweep at 4 am. "I knew I had to come and stay overnight, I just didn't trust my alarm clock," says Hlubi. The South African born Hlubi came back to South Africa after completing a master’s degree in International Relations; she currently is unemployed but makes money by selling clothing imported from the United States bought during discount sales.

Nokwazi Hlubi camped overnight in order to save her place. Her tent was removed from the stadium entrance by police on security sweep at 4 am. “I knew I had to come and stay overnight, I just didn’t trust my alarm clock,” says Hlubi. The South African born Hlubi came back to South Africa after completing a master’s degree in International Relations; she currently is unemployed but makes money by selling clothing imported from the United States bought during discount sales.

The queues to see the Lying in State – About 100,000 people were able to visit the body of Mandela, which lay in State for three days at the Union Buildings in Pretoria. Thousands more were turned away as queues stretched as long as 1km at park-and-ride stations close to the venue. At the L.C De Villiers Sports Ground, one of three park-and-ride stations in Pretoria, over 16 thousand people queued on Thursday 12 December.

The queues to see the Lying in State – About 100,000 people were able to visit the body of Mandela, which lay in State for three days at the Union Buildings in Pretoria. Thousands more were turned away as queues stretched as long as 1km at park-and-ride stations close to the venue. At the L.C De Villiers Sports Ground, one of three park-and-ride stations in Pretoria, over 16 thousand people queued on Thursday 12 December.

Carmen Sinevici (left) and Emaneul Chuwa hold hands as they sing farewell to the former president outside his house in Houghton. “It’s amazing; our hands just came together so easily. It just seemed right,”says Sinevici. “He was a great man and that’s why we are here. I had no time to see him at the Union Buildings so this is my goodbye,” says Chuwa Sinevici also came to the house to say goodbye. The anaesthetist was working the whole week and was unable to celebrate until that day.  “These whole few days we’ve been mourning have been sad. But all these moments shared here today gave me hope that the country is a united nation,” says Sinevici.

Carmen Sinevici (left) and Emaneul Chuwa hold hands as they sing farewell to the former president outside his house in Houghton. “It’s amazing; our hands just came together so easily. It just seemed right,”says Sinevici.
“He was a great man and that’s why we are here. I had no time to see him at the Union Buildings so this is my goodbye,” says Chuwa
Sinevici also came to the house to say goodbye. The anaesthetist was working the whole week and was unable to celebrate until that day.
“These whole few days we’ve been mourning have been sad. But all these moments shared here today gave me hope that the country is a united nation,” says Sinevici.

 

 

 

These pics say it all – Nelson #MandelaMemorial Service #madiba

My top photographs from the Nelson Mandela Memorial Service.

Hundreds of people queued outside the FNB Stadium, in Johannesburg, at 4am in order to claim a seat at the Nelson Mandela Memorial Service.

Hundreds of people queued outside the FNB Stadium, in Johannesburg, at 4am in order to claim a seat at the Nelson Mandela Memorial Service.

The service is held in honor of Mandela who passed away on 5 December 2013, a few days before. Over 91 heads of state were expected to attend the event.

The service is held in honor of Mandela who passed away on 5 December 2013, a few days before. Over 91 heads of state were expected to attend the event.

The front of the queue at 04h50.

The front of the queue at 04h50.

Nelson Mandela Memorial

Nokwazi Hlubi camped overnight in order to save her place. Her tent was removed from the stadium entrance by police on sercurity sweep at 4am.  "I knew I had to come and stay overnight, I just didn't trust my alarm clock," says Hlubi.

Nokwazi Hlubi camped overnight in order to save her place. Her tent was removed from the stadium entrance by police on sercurity sweep at 4am. “I knew I had to come and stay overnight, I just didn’t trust my alarm clock,” says Hlubi.

South African born Hlubi came back to South Africa after completing a masters degree in International Relations , she currently is unemployed but makes money by selling clothing imported from the United States bought during discount sales.

South African born Hlubi came back to South Africa after completing a masters degree in International Relations , she currently is unemployed but makes money by selling clothing imported from the United States bought during discount sales.

Celebrations began early in the morning with people dancing and chanting struggle songs.

Celebrations began early in the morning with people dancing and chanting struggle songs.

Others made use of their cell phones.

Others made use of their cell phones.

The gates to the stadium were opened at 06h30.

The gates to the stadium were opened at 06h30.

The gates to the stadium were opened at 06h30.

The gates to the stadium were opened at 06h30.

The gates to the stadium were opened at 06h30.

The gates to the stadium were opened at 06h30.

The FNB Stadium, before the ceremony.

The FNB Stadium, before the ceremony.

The media station. Reporters will stand over a small marker to cover regular live broadcasts.

The media station. Reporters will stand over a small marker to cover regular live broadcasts.

Celebrators dancing on the staircase leading to the lower stands of the stadium.

Celebrators dancing on the staircase leading to the lower stands of the stadium.

Reporters writing articles and look at their footage just beyond the crowds.

Reporters writing articles and look at their footage just beyond the crowds.

Nelson Mandela Memorial Nelson Mandela Memorial

The rain did not stop hundreds of civilians from walking over two kilometers from the road blocks to come to the stadium.

The rain did not stop hundreds of civilians from walking over two kilometers from the road blocks to come to the stadium.

I made front page for CNBC Africa as well as for Forbes Africa’s Facebook page

20131211 Nelson Mandela Memorial_CNBC

These pic say it all – #RIPNELSONMANDELA

Yesterday, 05 December 2013, South Africans and the world said goodbye to a legend, Nelson Mandela.

I was outside his house early this morning to see hundreds of people dressed in pajamas,suits and cycling shorts all wanted to pay their respects to the former South African president.

trendsmap

Trendsmap from this morning

Sandile Shangase, a law student at the University of the Witwatersrand, stands with Christopher Strong, a pupil at St Johns college, commeorate the death of former South African President Nelson Mandela outside his home in Houghton, Johannesburg, South Africa.

Sandile Shangase, a law student at the University of the Witwatersrand, stands with Christopher Strong, a pupil at St Johns college, to commemorate the death of former South African President Nelson Mandela outside his home in Houghton, Johannesburg, South Africa.

Nelson Mandela Houghton

Flowers and candles placed outside his house

Nelson Mandela Houghton

Luc Reymond stands with his mother Kate and sister Mia. Luc left his school blazer as a memoir hoping it will keep the passed President warm in the afterlife. Kate said the boy wanted to leave behind something he loved wearing. Hundreds of South Africans have placed flowers and candles outside the house of former South African President Nelson Mandela to commemorate the death in Houghton, Johannesburg, South Africa.

Luc Reymond stands with his mother Kate and sister Mia. Luc left his school blazer as a memoir hoping it will keep the passed President warm in the afterlife. Kate said the boy wanted to leave behind something he loved wearing. Hundreds of South Africans have placed flowers and candles outside the house of former South African President Nelson Mandela to commemorate the death in Houghton, Johannesburg, South Africa.

The blazer on the pile of  flowers.

The blazer on the pile of flowers.

Nelson Mandela Houghton Nelson Mandela Houghton Nelson Mandela Houghton Nelson Mandela Houghton Nelson Mandela Houghton Nelson Mandela Houghton